About Serengeti National Park

About Serengeti

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About Serengeti National Park


Be moved by the great migration in this dynamic ecosystem

It’s the only place where you can witness millions of migrating wildebeest over the Acacia plains, it’s the cradle of human life, and probably the closest to an untouched African wilderness you will ever get: welcome to the Serengeti National Park. Where time seems to stand still, despite the thousands of animals constantly on the move.


Greatest wildlife destination on earth


The magic of the Serengeti is not easy to describe in words. Not only seeing, but also hearing the buzz of millions of wildebeest so thick in the air that it vibrates through your entire body is something you will try to describe to friends and family, before realising it’s impossible. Vistas of honey-lit plains at sunset so beautiful, it’s worth the trip just to witness this. The genuine smiles of the Maasai people, giving you an immediate warming glow inside. Or just the feeling of constantly being amongst thousands of animals – it doesn’t matter what season of the migration you visit the Serengeti National Park, it’s magical all year round.


The never-ending circle of the Great Migration


Serengeti National Park was one of the first sites listed as a World Heritage Site when United Nations delegates met in Stockholm in 1972. Already by the late 1950s, this area had been recognised as a unique ecosystem, providing us with many insights into how the natural world functions and showing us how dynamic ecosystems really are.

Today, most visitors come here with one aim alone: to witness millions of wildebeest, zebras, gazelles and elands on a mass trek to quench their thirst for water and eat fresh grass. During this great cyclical movement, these ungulates move around the ecosystem in a seasonal pattern, defined by rainfall and grass nutrients. These large herds of animals on the move can’t be witnessed anywhere else. Whereas other famous wildlife parks are fenced, the Serengeti is protected, but unfenced. Giving animals enough space to make their return journey, one that they’ve been doing for millions of years. Read more about the Great Migration.


Beyond the Great Migration


Even though the migration is one of the main reasons to visit the Serengeti, it’s worth looking beyond this immense spectacle. First of all, nature can’t be directed. Having realistic expectations of your chances to witness a river crossing, or a large herd on the move, is crucial. A river crossing for example often only lasts thirty minutes, so can be missed in the blink of an eye. But don’t let this discourage you: there are plenty of other reasons to visit the Serengeti. If it’s not for this vast stretch of land where you can drive forever and never get enough, it might be for the incredible skies of dazzling colours, or the primal feeling of excitement when a deep dark-grey thunderstorm appears on the broad horizon. Or you might answer the lion’s call, and come to the Serengeti for one of the largest concentrations of predators in the world: the herds support about 7,500 hyenas, 3,000 lions and 250 cheetahs. And how about the silent grey giants? Elephants in the Serengeti amble over the plains into the woodlands, feasting on leaves and tree branches. Read more about wildlife in Serengeti wildlife.


Tribes in the cradle of human life


Even though animals still rule the plains of the Serengeti, this area has an incredibly long history of human occupation. Not only humans, but also human ancestors (Australopithecus afarensi) lived in this area for almost 4 million years. Today, the Serengeti is still home to several indigenous tribes. One of the most famous tribes is the Kenya Maasai: this tribe is unique and popular due to their long-preserved culture. Despite education, civilization and western cultural influences, the Maasai people have clung to their traditional way of life, making them a symbol of Kenyan culture.

Other tribes in the area are the Wakuria, a tribe whose homeland stretches from inside Kenya along the western boundary of the park in Tanzania. The Waikoma tribe replaces Wakuria further south, to give way to the Wasukuma even further south: a very large tribe that stretches southwards along the south-west boundary. These tribes are agro-pastoralists: living off agriculture and small livestock.


Vibrancy, variety and vastness


You will soon realise that amazement doesn’t have boundaries in this world-renowned National Park of Tanzania. Serengeti is a transition area, with distinct changeovers going from rich flat soils, to poor hilly soils in the north, attracting a wide variety of vegetation and animals. Whether you are looking for big cats, birds or even smaller creatures: Serengeti delivers. Even to understand and experience just a small part of this ecosystem, will change your vision on our world and the environment.

After being overwhelmed by the vibrancy, variety and vastness of this land, this place of transition will leave you changed forever.


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  • Location
    Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
  • Email Address
    info@serengeti.com